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Category: Stem Cell Research

A key gene enables the repair of injured muscle throughout life. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and published online July 21 in Cell Reports.

Full articleJuly 21, 2016 05:12 PM696 views
Category: Bioinformatics


Right: Photograph during excavation exhibiting excellent dry preservation of plant remains
Left: A well-preserved, desiccated barley grain found at Yoram Cave
An international team of researchers has succeeded for the first time in sequencing the genome of Chalcolithic barley grains. This is the oldest plant genome to be reconstructed to date. The 6,000-year-old seeds were retrieved from Yoram Cave in the southern cliff of Masada fortress in the Judean Desert in Israel, close to the Dead Sea. Genetically, the prehistoric barley is very similar to present-day barley grown in the Southern Levant, supporting the existing hypothesis of barley domestication having occurred in the Upper Jordan Valley.

Full articleJuly 18, 2016 06:59 PM1004 views
Category: AIDS & HIV

Investigators from the National Institutes of Health have discovered that cells from HIV-infected people whose virus is suppressed with treatment harbor defective HIV DNA that can nevertheless be transcribed into a template for producing HIV-related proteins. This finding may affect scientists' understanding of the long-term effects of HIV infection and what a cure would require.

Full articleJuly 18, 2016 06:59 PM828 views
Category: Microbiology


Zika virus infects numerous primary cell types and explants of the human placenta, suggesting placental and paraplacental routes of virus transmission.
Zika virus can infect numerous cell types in the human placenta and amniotic sac, according to researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley who show in a new paper how the virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus. They also identify a drug that may be able to block it.

Full articleJuly 18, 2016 06:59 PM953 views
Category: Health & Medicine


Updates to the zoonotic niche map of Ebola virus disease in Africa by David Pigott et al.
Though the West African Ebola outbreak that began in 2013 is now under control, 23 countries remain environmentally suitable for animal-to-human transmission of the Ebola virus. Only seven of these countries have experienced cases of Ebola, leaving the remaining 16 countries potentially unaware of regions of suitability, and therefore underprepared for future outbreaks.

Full articleJuly 14, 2016 05:11 PM1300 views
Category: Biotechnology

Dr. Gang Zheng and a team of biomedical researchers have discovered a "smart" organic, biodegradable nanoparticle that uses heat and light in a controlled manner to potentially target and ablate tumours with greater precision.

Full articleJuly 14, 2016 05:11 PM1704 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


Atomic force microscopy image of the pore.
The best hiding place often lies behind enemy lines, as many bacteria such as the pathogens responsible for tuberculosis or typhoid have realized. They invade immune cells and can survive there, well hidden, for some time. To eliminate such invaders, the host macrophages can initiate a suicide program. Together with researchers at the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research and ETH Zurich, the team led by Prof. Sebastian Hiller from the Biozentrum at the University of Basel has shown for the first time that a "death protein" perforates the cell membrane, resulting in macrophage bursting open. The re-exposed pathogens can then again be fought by the immune system.

Full articleJuly 14, 2016 05:11 PM1259 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

A powerful new technology that maps the "social network" of proteins in breast cancer cells is providing detailed understanding of the disease at a molecular level and could eventually lead to new treatments, Australian scientists say.

Full articleJuly 14, 2016 05:11 PM1151 views
Category: Biology

The discovery of a theropod dinosaur with Tyrannosaurus rex-like arms suggests that these unusual forelimbs may have evolved multiple times, according to a study published July 13, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sebastián Apesteguía from the Universidad Maimónides, Argentina, and colleagues.

Full articleJuly 14, 2016 05:11 PM1537 views
Category: Stem Cell Research

Scientists have discovered a new method of creating human stem cells which could solve the big problem of the large-scale production needed to fully realise the potential of these remarkable cells for understanding and treating disease.

Full articleJuly 13, 2016 05:56 PM1585 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

A common feature of cancer and aging is cells' reduced ability to respond to stress-induced damage to DNA or cellular structures. Specifically, changes occur in the protective processes of apoptosis and cellular senescence, whose roles in cancer and aging are thoroughly reviewed by Cerella et al. in Current Drug Targets (Bentham Science Publishers). The authors outline the evidence that these processes are regulated by separate but intertwined pathways. Understanding the precise mechanisms, they conclude, could lead to combination therapies for cancer and aging able to harness the benefits of both apoptosis and senescence, while limiting the drawbacks of either.

Full articleJuly 13, 2016 05:55 PM1181 views
Category: Health & Medicine

The microscopic organisms that live in our gut do more than help us digest food. A new study in rats bolsters a growing body of evidence that the complex mix of microorganisms found in the gut, known as gut microbiota, could influence a person's likelihood of developing colon cancer.

Full articleJuly 13, 2016 05:55 PM1187 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


Aminopeptidase N is a protein that acts as a receptor for coronaviruses, the family of viruses behind recent epidemics of SARS and MERS, among others.
BETHESDA, MD - The constant battle between pathogens and their hosts has long been recognized as a key driver of evolution, but until now scientists have not had the tools to look at these patterns globally across species and genomes. In a new study, researchers apply big-data analysis to reveal the full extent of viruses' impact on the evolution of humans and other mammals.

Full articleJuly 13, 2016 05:55 PM1188 views
Category: Microbiology

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS have identified two new strains of the HTLV-4 virus in two hunters who were bitten by gorillas in Gabon. These findings, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, support the notion that gorillas represent a major source of infectious agents that can be passed on to humans.

Full articleJuly 13, 2016 05:55 PM847 views

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