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Category: AIDS & HIV


Fewer newly diagnosed adults seek HIV care, possibly because they do not yet feel sick.
Between December 2009 and February 2011, health workers with the AMPATH Consortium sought to test and counsel every adult resident in the Bunyala subcounty of Kenya for HIV. A study in the journal Lancet HIV reports that the campaign yielded more than 1,300 new positive diagnoses, but few of those new patients sought health care.

Full articleJanuary 29, 2015 06:35 PM936 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory have uncovered a remarkable, new proofreading mechanism. In general, enzymatic machines are responsible for weeding out and correcting errors.
Cold Spring Harbor, NY - Building a protein is a lot like a game of telephone: information is passed along from one messenger to another, creating the potential for errors every step of the way. There are separate, specialized enzymatic machines that proofread at each step, ensuring that the instructions encoded in our DNA are faithfully translated into proteins. Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have uncovered a new quality control mechanism along this path, but in a remarkable role reversal, the proofreading isn't done by an enzyme. Instead, one of the messengers itself has a built-in mechanism to prevent errors along the way.

Full articleJanuary 29, 2015 06:35 PM537 views
Category: Biology


Research by scientists and conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Zoological Society of London, and other groups published today in PLOS ONE shows that critically endangered Saharan cheetahs exist...
Research by scientists and conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Zoological Society of London, and other groups published today in PLOS ONE shows that critically endangered Saharan cheetahs exist at incredibly low densities and require vast areas for their conservation. The research also offers some of the world's only photographs of this elusive big cat.

Full articleJanuary 29, 2015 06:35 PM716 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


XPC DNA repair protein shown in two modes, patrolling undamaged DNA (in green) and bound to DNA damage site (magenta, with blue XPC insert opening the site).
Sites where DNA is damaged may cause a molecule that slides along the DNA strand to scan for damage to slow on its patrol, delaying it long enough to recognize and initiate repair. The finding suggests that the delay itself may be the key that allows the protein molecule to find its target, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Full articleJanuary 28, 2015 06:07 PM1139 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

Scientists have shed light on how naturally occurring mutations can be introduced into our DNA.

Full articleJanuary 27, 2015 06:56 PM1559 views
Category: Bioinformatics


Scientists took a computational approach using the Stampede and Lonestar supercomputers to compare lab data with reference genomes of over a thousand strains of Arabidopsis sampled throughout Europe and Asia.
Scientists using supercomputers found genes sensitive to cold and drought in a plant help it survive climate change. These findings increase basic understanding of plant adaptation and can be applied to improve crops.

Full articleJanuary 27, 2015 06:56 PM964 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


This image of a mouse brain shows the two neurons, CAMKII (in red) that triggers thirst and VGAT (in green) that inhibit thirst.
NEW YORK, NY (January 26, 2015)--Neurons that trigger our sense of thirst--and neurons that turn it off--have been identified by Columbia University Medical Center neuroscientists. The paper was published today in the online edition of Nature.

Full articleJanuary 26, 2015 06:41 PM1850 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

Scientists have identified a gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system are insulated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report.

Full articleJanuary 22, 2015 07:19 PM2695 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


A study conducted in C. elegans worms (left) revealed genes involved in forming long-term memories.
A new study has identified genes involved in long-term memory in the worm as part of research aimed at finding ways to retain cognitive abilities during aging.

Full articleJanuary 22, 2015 07:19 PM1979 views
Category: Bioinformatics

Positional cloning is a genetic mapping technique used to pinpoint the location of specific traits of interest, such as disease-causing genes or mutations, within the genome. Very simply, this map-based technique involves crossing mutant individuals with wild-type individuals and examining the offspring in order to localize a candidate region in the genome for the mutation. By identifying genetic markers that are linked to the trait, progressively more precise areas on a chromosome are defined until the gene is identified.

Full articleJanuary 20, 2015 05:56 PM2189 views
Category: Bioinformatics


A new method helps scientists create a more accurate picture of gene expression in different cell types, and reveals hidden subtypes of cells.
A new method for analysing RNA sequence data allows researchers to identify new subtypes of cells, creating order out of seeming chaos. Published in Nature Biotechnology, the novel technique developed by scientists at The European Molecular Biology Laboratory's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) represents a major step forward for single-cell genomics.

Full articleJanuary 20, 2015 05:56 PM2926 views
Category: Biology


The images show two species of cone snail, Conus geographus (left) and Conus tulipa (right) attempting to capture their fish prey. As they approach potential prey, the snails release a...
As predators go, cone snails are slow-moving and lack the typical fighting parts. They've made up for it by producing a vast array of fast-acting toxins that target the nervous systems of prey. A new study reveals that some cone snails add a weaponized form of insulin to the venom cocktail they use to disable fish.

Full articleJanuary 19, 2015 04:49 PM3636 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


A team of researchers at CSHL has discovered a novel circuit in the mouse brain that controls fear. The red cells are neurons identified by a "trans-synaptic tracing technique"
Some people have no fear, like that 17-year-old kid who drives like a maniac. But for the nearly 40 million adults who suffer from anxiety disorders, an overabundance of fear rules their lives. Debilitating anxiety prevents them from participating in life's most mundane moments, from driving a car to riding in an elevator. Today, a team of researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) describes a new pathway that controls fear memories and behavior in the mouse brain, offering mechanistic insight into how anxiety disorders may arise.

Full articleJanuary 19, 2015 04:49 PM2748 views
Category: Biology


This is the skull of an extinct short-faced kangaroo (Simosthenurus occidentalis). Ancient DNA from these animals reveals they are a highly distinct evolutionary lineage.
Scientists have finally managed to extract DNA from Australia's extinct giant kangaroos - the mysterious marsupial megafauna that roamed Australia over 40,000 years ago.

Full articleJanuary 15, 2015 06:00 PM3510 views

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