Biology News Net
RSS 2.0 Feed

Latest Biology Articles, News & Current Events

Sort latest biology articles & news by Date | Popularity
Category: Health & Medicine

Researchers involved in an international collaboration across six institutions, including the University of Copenhagen and the National Aquarium of Denmark (Den BlÄ Planet), have successfully identified the exact composition of sea snake venom, which makes the future development of synthetic antivenoms more realistic. Currently, sea snake anitvenom costs nearly USD 2000, yet these new findings could result in a future production of synthetic antivenoms for as little as USD 10-100.

Full articleSeptember 3, 2015 04:44 PM311 views
Category: Biology

A sophisticated imaging technique has allowed scientists to virtually peer inside a 10-million-year-old sea urchin, uncovering a treasure trove of hidden fossils.

Full articleSeptember 3, 2015 04:44 PM311 views
Category: Environment

Data scientists at the University of Warwick are starting a new project using innovative visualisation techniques, which they believe could transform how evidence is used to inform climate change adaptation initiatives.

Full articleSeptember 3, 2015 04:44 PM233 views
Category: Stem Cell Research

An international team of scientists led from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet has for the first time mapped all the genes that are activated in the first few days of a fertilized human egg. The study, which is being published in the journal Nature Communications, provides an in-depth understanding of early embryonic development in human - and scientists now hope that the results will help finding for example new therapies against infertility.

Full articleSeptember 3, 2015 04:44 PM273 views
Category: Health & Medicine

The trillions of bacteria in your digestive system play a major role in your metabolism, and they're linked to your risks of type 2 diabetes, obesity and the related conditions that make up "metabolic syndrome," which has become a global health epidemic. Humans and animal models with diabetes and obesity have different gut bacteria than those who don't, and when scientists transfer microbiota from obese humans or animals to germ-free animals, the recipients are more likely to become obese or diabetic.

Full articleSeptember 3, 2015 04:44 PM270 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

In the breast, cancer stem cells and normal stem cells can arise from different cell types but tap into distinct yet related stem cell programs, according to Whitehead Institute researchers. The differences between these stem cell programs may be significant enough to be exploited by future therapeutics.

Full articleSeptember 3, 2015 04:44 PM244 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

Altering the protein recycling complexes in human cells, including cancer cells, allows the cells to resist treatment with a class of drugs known as proteasome inhibitors, according to Whitehead Institute scientists.

Full articleSeptember 2, 2015 04:39 PM755 views
Category: Biotechnology

Advances in 3-D printing have led to new ways to make bone and some other relatively simple body parts that can be implanted in patients. But finding an ideal bio-ink has stalled progress toward printing more complex tissues with versatile functions -- tissues that can be loaded with pharmaceuticals, for example. Now scientists, reporting in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, have developed a silk-based ink that could open up new possibilities toward that goal.

Full articleSeptember 2, 2015 04:39 PM790 views
Category: Biology


Tiny sea sapphires' iridescence, created by a regular array of thin transparent crystal plates, is also the secret of their "disappearance. "
Tiny ocean creatures known as sea sapphires perform a sort of magic trick as they swim: One second they appear in splendid iridescent shades of blue, purple or green, and the next they may turn invisible (at least the blue ones turn completely transparent). How do they get their bright colors and what enables them to "disappear?" New research at the Weizmann Institute has solved the mystery of these colorful, vanishing creatures, which are known scientifically as Sapphirinidae. The findings, which recently appeared in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, could inspire the development of new optical technologies.

Full articleSeptember 2, 2015 04:39 PM740 views
Category: Bioinformatics


BioJS conference group is shown.
Drawing upon reusable components to visualise and analyse biological data on the web, BioJS data is freely available to users and developers where they can modify, extend and redistribute the software with few restrictions, at no cost. With a vision for 'every online biological dataset in the world should be visualised with BioJS tools', the community hopes to achieve the largest, most comprehensive repository of JavaScript tools to visualise online biological data, available for all.

Full articleSeptember 2, 2015 04:39 PM411 views
Category: Biotechnology


Scientists have developed a method, using a double layer of lipids, which facilitates the assembly of DNA origami units, bringing us one-step closer to DNA nanomachines.
Scientists have been studying ways to use synthetic DNA as a building block for smaller and faster devices. DNA has the advantage of being inherently "coded". Each DNA strand is formed of one of four "codes" that can link to only one complementary code each, thus binding two DNA strands together. Scientists are using this inherent coding to manipulate and "fold" DNA to form "origami nanostructures": extremely small two- and three-dimensional shapes that can then be used as construction material to build nanodevices such as nanomotors for use in targeted drug delivery inside the body.

Full articleSeptember 1, 2015 05:59 PM1629 views
Category: Biotechnology

The study, published today at Nature Methods (the most prestigious journal for the presentation of results in methods development), proposes the use of two plant protein epitopes, named inntags, as the most innocuous and stable tagging tools in the study of physical and functional interactions of proteins.

Full articleSeptember 1, 2015 05:59 PM697 views
Category: Biology


Elite hunter from bat world has previously unknown cues at its disposal.
The ability of some bats to spot motionless prey in the dark has baffled experts until now. By creating the first visual images from echolocation, researchers reveal we have been missing how bats sense their world.

Full articleSeptember 1, 2015 05:59 PM857 views
Category: Gene Therapy

Mice lacking the protein retGC1, which is deficient in humans suffering Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1), a disorder that causes severe visual impairment beginning in infancy, received gene therapy to replace retGC1 and showed fully restored visual function that persisted for at least 6 months. The success of this approach strongly support clinical testing of a gene therapy targeted to the retinas of LCA1 patients, conclude the authors of the study published in Human Gene Therapy. The article is available free on the Human Gene Therapy website until September 30, 2015.

Full articleAugust 31, 2015 02:34 PM1089 views

Previous Biology Articles & News




Search Bio News Net


Free Biology Newsletter

Most Popular Bio News

Biology Articles & News
Last 7 Days

Biology Articles & News
Last 30 Days