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Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

Scientists have shed light on how naturally occurring mutations can be introduced into our DNA.

Full articleJanuary 27, 2015 06:56 PM225 views
Category: Bioinformatics


Scientists took a computational approach using the Stampede and Lonestar supercomputers to compare lab data with reference genomes of over a thousand strains of Arabidopsis sampled throughout Europe and Asia.
Scientists using supercomputers found genes sensitive to cold and drought in a plant help it survive climate change. These findings increase basic understanding of plant adaptation and can be applied to improve crops.

Full articleJanuary 27, 2015 06:56 PM152 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


This image of a mouse brain shows the two neurons, CAMKII (in red) that triggers thirst and VGAT (in green) that inhibit thirst.
NEW YORK, NY (January 26, 2015)--Neurons that trigger our sense of thirst--and neurons that turn it off--have been identified by Columbia University Medical Center neuroscientists. The paper was published today in the online edition of Nature.

Full articleJanuary 26, 2015 06:41 PM938 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

Scientists have identified a gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system are insulated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report.

Full articleJanuary 22, 2015 07:19 PM2157 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


A study conducted in C. elegans worms (left) revealed genes involved in forming long-term memories.
A new study has identified genes involved in long-term memory in the worm as part of research aimed at finding ways to retain cognitive abilities during aging.

Full articleJanuary 22, 2015 07:19 PM1504 views
Category: Bioinformatics

Positional cloning is a genetic mapping technique used to pinpoint the location of specific traits of interest, such as disease-causing genes or mutations, within the genome. Very simply, this map-based technique involves crossing mutant individuals with wild-type individuals and examining the offspring in order to localize a candidate region in the genome for the mutation. By identifying genetic markers that are linked to the trait, progressively more precise areas on a chromosome are defined until the gene is identified.

Full articleJanuary 20, 2015 05:56 PM1859 views
Category: Bioinformatics


A new method helps scientists create a more accurate picture of gene expression in different cell types, and reveals hidden subtypes of cells.
A new method for analysing RNA sequence data allows researchers to identify new subtypes of cells, creating order out of seeming chaos. Published in Nature Biotechnology, the novel technique developed by scientists at The European Molecular Biology Laboratory's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) represents a major step forward for single-cell genomics.

Full articleJanuary 20, 2015 05:56 PM2503 views
Category: Biology


The images show two species of cone snail, Conus geographus (left) and Conus tulipa (right) attempting to capture their fish prey. As they approach potential prey, the snails release a...
As predators go, cone snails are slow-moving and lack the typical fighting parts. They've made up for it by producing a vast array of fast-acting toxins that target the nervous systems of prey. A new study reveals that some cone snails add a weaponized form of insulin to the venom cocktail they use to disable fish.

Full articleJanuary 19, 2015 04:49 PM3055 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


A team of researchers at CSHL has discovered a novel circuit in the mouse brain that controls fear. The red cells are neurons identified by a "trans-synaptic tracing technique"
Some people have no fear, like that 17-year-old kid who drives like a maniac. But for the nearly 40 million adults who suffer from anxiety disorders, an overabundance of fear rules their lives. Debilitating anxiety prevents them from participating in life's most mundane moments, from driving a car to riding in an elevator. Today, a team of researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) describes a new pathway that controls fear memories and behavior in the mouse brain, offering mechanistic insight into how anxiety disorders may arise.

Full articleJanuary 19, 2015 04:49 PM2358 views
Category: Biology


This is the skull of an extinct short-faced kangaroo (Simosthenurus occidentalis). Ancient DNA from these animals reveals they are a highly distinct evolutionary lineage.
Scientists have finally managed to extract DNA from Australia's extinct giant kangaroos - the mysterious marsupial megafauna that roamed Australia over 40,000 years ago.

Full articleJanuary 15, 2015 06:00 PM3051 views
Category: Health & Medicine

Eczema wreaks havoc on its sufferers' lives with health problems that are more than skin deep. Adults who have eczema -- a chronic itchy skin disease that often starts in childhood -- have higher rates of smoking, drinking alcoholic beverages and obesity and are less likely to exercise than adults who don't have the disease, reports a new Northwestern Medicine® study.

Full articleJanuary 15, 2015 06:00 PM2651 views
Category: Stem Cell Research

A new device that can rapidly concentrate and extract young cells from irrigation fluid used during orthopaedic surgery holds promise for improving the delivery of stem cell therapy in cases of non-healing fractures. UC Davis surgeons plan to launch a "proof-of-concept" clinical trial to test the safety and efficacy of the device in the coming months.

Full articleJanuary 15, 2015 06:00 PM2681 views
Category: Biology


This image shows a perfectly preserved example of the Lower Jurassic fish Dapedium from Lyme Regis, Dorset. Perfectly preserved specimens such as this allow us to calculate the biomechanical function...
The feeding habits of an unusual 200-million-year-old fish have been uncovered by a University of Bristol undergraduate in a groundbreaking study which has been published in Palaeontology, a leading scientific journal, this week - a rare achievement for an undergraduate student.

Full articleJanuary 14, 2015 05:32 PM2538 views
Category: Biotechnology


Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have tested a temporary tattoo that both extracts and measures the level of glucose in the fluid in between skin cells.
Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have tested a temporary tattoo that both extracts and measures the level of glucose in the fluid in between skin cells. This first-ever example of the flexible, easy-to-wear device could be a promising step forward in noninvasive glucose testing for patients with diabetes.

Full articleJanuary 14, 2015 05:32 PM3206 views

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