RSS 2.0 Feed

Latest Biology Articles, News & Current Events

Sort latest biology articles & news by Date | Popularity
Category: Biology


This shows the female penis of N. aurora.
Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 17 have discovered little-known cave insects with rather novel sex lives. The Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species in the genus Neotrogla, are the first example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia.

Full articleApril 17, 2014 07:39 PM371 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness.

Full articleApril 17, 2014 07:38 PM326 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


This shows active droplets.
Droplets of filamentous material enclosed in a lipid membrane: these are the models of a "simplified" cell used by the SISSA physicists Luca Giomi and Antonio DeSimone, who simulated the spontaneous emergence of cell motility and division - that is, features of living material - in inanimate "objects". The research is one of the cover stories of the April 10th online issue of the journal Physical Review Letters.

Full articleApril 16, 2014 07:07 PM732 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


Here are Cian O'Donnell and Terry Sejnowski.
Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event.

Full articleApril 16, 2014 07:07 PM635 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


Mitochondria in hepatitis C-infected cells (bottom row) are self-destructing. The self-annihilation process explains the persistance and virulence of the virus in human liver cells.
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a mechanism that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long.

Full articleApril 15, 2014 06:14 PM1334 views
Category: Health & Medicine


This shows Hadza women roasting tubers.
The gut microbiota is responsible for many aspects of human health and nutrition, but most studies have focused on "western" populations. An international collaboration of researchers, including researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has for the first time analysed the gut microbiota of a modern hunter-gatherer community, the Hadza of Tanzania. The results of this work show that Hadza harbour a unique microbial profile with features yet unseen in any other human group, supporting the notion that Hadza gut bacteria play an essential role in adaptation to a foraging subsistence pattern. The study further shows how the intestinal flora may have helped our ancestors adapt and survive during the Paleolithic

Full articleApril 15, 2014 06:14 PM901 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology

Researchers have found a major piece of genetic evidence that confirms the role of a group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development.

Full articleApril 14, 2014 07:22 PM1921 views
Category: Health & Medicine

Scientists found that the molecule, called microRNA 135b, is a vital 'worker' employed by several important cancer genes to drive the growth of bowel cancers.

Full articleApril 14, 2014 07:22 PM1181 views
Category: Bioinformatics


Splicing variants (red) of autism genes were cloned from the brain and screened for interactions. The image on the right represents the network of interactions.
A team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has uncovered a new aspect of autism, revealing that proteins involved in autism interact with many more partners than previously known. These interactions had not been detected earlier because they involve alternatively spliced forms of autism genes found in the brain.

Full articleApril 11, 2014 07:52 PM1599 views
Category: Biology


The 375 million-year-old fossil lycopod Leclercqia scolopendra, described and beautifully rendered by UC Berkeley graduate student Jeffrey Benca.
Jeff Benca is an admitted über-geek when it comes to prehistoric plants, so it was no surprise that, when he submitted a paper describing a new species of long-extinct lycopod for publication, he ditched the standard line drawing and insisted on a detailed and beautifully rendered color reconstruction of the plant. This piece earned the cover of March's centennial issue of the American Journal of Botany.

Full articleApril 11, 2014 07:52 PM1861 views
Category: Biology

New research from scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School shows that fruit flies are secretly harboring the biochemistry needed to glow in the dark —otherwise known as bioluminescence.

Full articleApril 10, 2014 05:44 PM1764 views
Category: Molecular & Cell Biology


This is a confocal laser scanning microcope image of an early embryo with surrounding placental endosperm cells.
A new generation of high yield plants could be created following a fundamental change in our understanding of how plants develop.

Full articleApril 10, 2014 05:44 PM1633 views
Category: Biology

Stunning images of a 305-million-year-old harvestman fossil reveal ancestors of the modern-day arachnids had two sets of eyes rather than one.

Full articleApril 10, 2014 05:44 PM1507 views
Category: Environment


A graphical representation of the size of the asteroid thought to have killed the dinosaurs, and the crater it created, compared to an asteroid thought to have hit the Earth...
Picture this: A massive asteroid almost as wide as Rhode Island and about three to five times larger than the rock thought to have wiped out the dinosaurs slams into Earth. The collision punches a crater into the planet's crust that's nearly 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across: greater than the distance from Washington, D.C. to New York City, and up to two and a half times larger in diameter than the hole formed by the dinosaur-killing asteroid. Seismic waves bigger than any recorded earthquakes shake the planet for about half an hour at any one location – about six times longer than the huge earthquake that struck Japan three years ago. The impact also sets off tsunamis many times deeper than the one that followed the Japanese quake.

Full articleApril 9, 2014 06:20 PM1612 views

Previous Biology Articles & News




Search Bio News Net


Free Biology Newsletter